Who Serves Jiva, Serves God Indeed (7-2-24)

From The Complete Works of Swami Vivekananda Volume 7- Chapter 2 – Conversations And Dialogues. Taken from the Diary of a Disciple, Shri Sharat Chandra Chakravarty, B.A. After returning from Eastern Bengal Swamiji stayed in the Math and lived a simple childlike life. Every year some Santal labourers used to work in the Math. Swamiji would joke and make fun with them and loved to hear their tales of weal and woe. One day several noted gentlemen of Calcutta came to visit Swamiji in the Math. That day Swamiji had started such a warm talk with the Santals that, when he was informed of the arrival of those gentlemen, he said, “I shan’t be able to go now. I am happy with these men.” Really that day Swamiji did not leave the poor Santals to see those visitors. One among the Santals was named Keshta. Swamiji loved Keshta very much. Whenever Swamiji came to talk with them, Keshta used to say to Swamiji, “O my Swamiji, do not come to us when we are working, for while talking with you our work stops and the supervising Swami rebukes us afterwards.” Swamiji would be touched by these words and say, “No, no, he will not say anything; tell me a little about your part of the country”– saying which he used to introduce the topic of their worldly affairs. One day Swamiji said to Keshta, “Well, will you take food here one day?” Keshta said, “We do not take food touched by you; if you put salt in our food and we eat it, we shall lose our caste.” Swamiji...

In The Fulness of Time One Attains to Knowledge Within Himself (7-2-23)

From The Complete Works of Swami Vivekananda Volume 7- Chapter 2 – Conversations And Dialogues. Taken from the Diary of a Disciple, Shri Sharat Chandra Chakravarty, B.A. Today is the anniversary celebration of Shri Ramakrishna — the last that Swamiji ever saw. The disciple presented an invocatory hymn on Shri Ramakrishna to Swamiji. He then proceeded to rub Swamiji’s feet gently. Before starting to read the poem, Swamiji spoke to him: “Do it very gently as the feet have become very tender.” After reading the poem Swamiji said, “It is well done.” Swamiji’s illness had increased so much that the disciple, observing it, felt sore at heart. Understanding his inner feeling, Swamiji said, “What are you thinking? This body is born and it will die. If I have been able to instil a few of my ideas into you all, then I shall know that my birth has not been in vain.” Disciple: Are we fit objects of your mercy? If you bless me, without taking my fitness into consideration, then I will consider myself fortunate. Swamiji: Always remember that renunciation is the┬ároot idea. Unless one is initiated into this idea, not even Brahma and the World – gods have the power to attain Mukti. Disciple: It is a matter of deep regret that even hearing this from you almost every day, I have not been able to realise it. Swamiji: Renunciation must come, but in the fulness of time. “[(Sanskrit)]– in the fulness of time one attains to knowledge within himself.” When the few Samskaras (tendencies) of the previous life are spent, then renunciation sprouts up in the...

Go on Working Without an Eye to Results (7-2-22)

From The Complete Works of Swami Vivekananda Volume 7- Chapter 2 – Conversations And Dialogues. Taken from the Diary of a Disciple, Shri Sharat Chandra Chakravarty, B.A. At the time Belur Math was established, many among the orthodox Hindus were wont to make sharp criticism of the ways of life in the Math. Hearing the report of such criticism from the disciple, Swamiji would say (in the words of the couplet of Tulasidas), “The elephant passes in the market – place, and a thousand curs begin barking after him; so the Sadhus have no ill – feeling when worldly people slander then.” Or again he would say, “Without persecution no beneficent idea can enter into the heart of a society.” He would exhort everybody, “Go on working without an eye to results. One day you are sure to reap the fruits of it.” Again, on the lips of Swamiji were very often heard the words of the Gita, “A doer of good never comes to grief, my son.” In May or June, 1901, seeing the disciple at the Math Swamiji said, “Bring me a copy of Ashtavimshati – tattva (Twenty – eight Categories) of Raghunandan at an early date.” Disciple: Yes, sir, but what will you do with the Raghunandan Smriti, which the present educated India calls a heap of superstition? Swamiji: Why? Raghunandan was a wonderful scholar of his time. Collecting the ancient Smritis, he codified the customs and observances of the Hindus, adapting them to the needs of the changed times and circumstances. All Bengal is following the rules laid down by him. But in the iron...

Whose child am I? (7-2-21)

From The Complete Works of Swami Vivekananda Volume 7- Chapter 2 – Conversations And Dialogues. Taken from the Diary of a Disciple, Shri Sharat Chandra Chakravarty, B.A. Swamiji is staying at the Math nowadays. His health is not very good, but he goes out for a walk in the mornings and evenings. The disciple, after bowing at the feet of Swamiji, inquired about his health. Swamiji: Well, this body is in such a pitiable condition, but none of you are stepping forward to help in my work! What shall I do single – handed? This time the body has come out of the soil of Bengal, so can it bear the strain of much work? You who come here are pure souls; and if you do not become my helpers in this work, what shall I do alone? Disciple: Sir, these self – sacrificing Brahmacharins and Sannyasins are standing behind you, and I think that each one of them can devote his life to your work — still why do you speak in this way? Swamiji: Well, I want a band of young Bengal — who alone are the hope of this country. My hope of the future lies in the youths of character — intelligent, renouncing all for the service of others, and obedient — who can sacrifice their lives in working out my ideas and thereby do good to themselves and the country at large. Otherwise, boys of the common run are coming in groups and will come. Dullness is written on their faces — their hearts are devoid of energy, their bodies feeble and unfit for...

Do you see yourself that you have eyes? (7-2-20)

From The Complete Works of Swami Vivekananda Volume 7- Chapter 2 – Conversations And Dialogues. Taken from the Diary of a Disciple, Shri Sharat Chandra Chakravarty, B.A. Swamiji is much better under the Ayurvedic treatment. The disciple is at the Math. While attending on Swamiji, he asked, “The Atman is all – pervading, the very life of the life of all beings, and so very near. Still why is It not perceived?” Swamiji: Do you see yourself that you have eyes? When others speak of the eyes, then you are reminded that you have got eyes. Again when dust or sand enters into them and sets up an irritation, then you feel quite well that you have got eyes. Similarly the realisation of this universal Atman which is inner than the innermost is not easily attained. Reading from scriptures or hearing from the lips of the preceptor, one has some idea of It, but when the hard lashes of the bitter sorrow and pain of the world make the heart sore, when on the death of one’s near and dear relatives, man thinks himself helpless, when the impenetrable and insurmountable darkness about the future life agitates his mind, then does the Jiva pant for a realisation of the Atman. Therefore is sorrow helpful to the knowledge of the Atman. But one should remember the bitter lesson of experience. Those who die, merely suffering the woes of life like cats and dogs, are they men? He is a man who even when agitated by the sharp interaction of pleasure and pain is discriminating, and knowing them to be of an...