“Peace Be to All Creatures and The Universe!” (7-2-26)

From The Complete Works of Swami Vivekananda Volume 7- Chapter 2 – Conversations And Dialogues. Taken from the Diary of a Disciple, Shri Sharat Chandra Chakravarty, B.A. The disciple passed the preceding night in Swamiji’s room. At 4 a.m. Swamiji roused him and said “Go and knock up the Sadhus and Brahmacharins from sleep with the bell.” In pursuance of the order, the disciple rang the bell near the Sadhus who slept. The monastic inmates hastened to go to the worship – room for meditation. According to Swamiji’s instructions, the disciple rang the bell lustily near Swami Brahmananda’s bed, which made the latter exclaim, “Good heavens! The Bangal [ Meaning an East Bengal man, used as a term of endearing reproach for the disciple.] has made it too hot for us to stay in the Math!” On the disciple’s communicating this to Swamiji, he burst out into a hearty laugh, saying, “Well done!” Then Swamiji, too, washed his face and entered the chapel accompanied by the disciple. The Sannyasins — swami Brahmananda and others — were already seated for meditation. A separate seat was kept for Swamiji, on which he sat facing the east, and pointing to a seat in front to the disciple, said, “Go and meditate, sitting there.” Shortly after taking his seat, Swamiji became perfectly calm and motionless, like a statue, and his breathing became very slow. Everyone else kept his seat. After about an hour and a half, Swamiji rose from meditation with the words “Shiva, Shiva”. His eyes were flushed, the expression placid, calm, and grave. Bowing before Shri Ramakrishna he came downstairs and paced the...

“Men Should Be Ignored Like Worms” (7-2-25)

From The Complete Works of Swami Vivekananda Volume 7- Chapter 2 – Conversations And Dialogues. Taken from the Diary of a Disciple, Shri Sharat Chandra Chakravarty, B.A. It was Saturday, and the disciple came to the Math just before evening. An austere routine was being followed now at the Math regarding spiritual practices. Swamiji had issued an order that all Brahmacharins and Sannyasins should get up very early in the morning and practise Japa and meditation in the worship – room. Swamiji was having little sleep during these days, and would rise from bed at three in the morning. On the disciple saluting Swamiji just after his appearance at the Math, he said, “Well, see how they are practising religious exercises here nowadays. Everyone passes a considerable time in Japa and meditation on mornings and evenings. Look there — a bell has been procured, which is used for rousing all from sleep. Everyone has to get up before dawn. Shri Ramakrishna used to say, `In the morning and evening the mind remains highly imbued with Sattva ideas; those are the times when one should meditate with earnestness.’ “After the passing away of Shri Ramakrishna we underwent a lot of religious practice at the Baranagore Math. We used to get up at 3 a.m. and after washing our face etc.– some after bath, and others without it — we would sit in the worship – room and become absorbed in Japa and meditation. What a strong spirit of dispassion we had in those days! We had no thought even as to whether the world existed or not. Ramakrishnananda busied himself...

Who Serves Jiva, Serves God Indeed (7-2-24)

From The Complete Works of Swami Vivekananda Volume 7- Chapter 2 – Conversations And Dialogues. Taken from the Diary of a Disciple, Shri Sharat Chandra Chakravarty, B.A. After returning from Eastern Bengal Swamiji stayed in the Math and lived a simple childlike life. Every year some Santal labourers used to work in the Math. Swamiji would joke and make fun with them and loved to hear their tales of weal and woe. One day several noted gentlemen of Calcutta came to visit Swamiji in the Math. That day Swamiji had started such a warm talk with the Santals that, when he was informed of the arrival of those gentlemen, he said, “I shan’t be able to go now. I am happy with these men.” Really that day Swamiji did not leave the poor Santals to see those visitors. One among the Santals was named Keshta. Swamiji loved Keshta very much. Whenever Swamiji came to talk with them, Keshta used to say to Swamiji, “O my Swamiji, do not come to us when we are working, for while talking with you our work stops and the supervising Swami rebukes us afterwards.” Swamiji would be touched by these words and say, “No, no, he will not say anything; tell me a little about your part of the country”– saying which he used to introduce the topic of their worldly affairs. One day Swamiji said to Keshta, “Well, will you take food here one day?” Keshta said, “We do not take food touched by you; if you put salt in our food and we eat it, we shall lose our caste.” Swamiji...

In The Fulness of Time One Attains to Knowledge Within Himself (7-2-23)

From The Complete Works of Swami Vivekananda Volume 7- Chapter 2 – Conversations And Dialogues. Taken from the Diary of a Disciple, Shri Sharat Chandra Chakravarty, B.A. Today is the anniversary celebration of Shri Ramakrishna — the last that Swamiji ever saw. The disciple presented an invocatory hymn on Shri Ramakrishna to Swamiji. He then proceeded to rub Swamiji’s feet gently. Before starting to read the poem, Swamiji spoke to him: “Do it very gently as the feet have become very tender.” After reading the poem Swamiji said, “It is well done.” Swamiji’s illness had increased so much that the disciple, observing it, felt sore at heart. Understanding his inner feeling, Swamiji said, “What are you thinking? This body is born and it will die. If I have been able to instil a few of my ideas into you all, then I shall know that my birth has not been in vain.” Disciple: Are we fit objects of your mercy? If you bless me, without taking my fitness into consideration, then I will consider myself fortunate. Swamiji: Always remember that renunciation is the root idea. Unless one is initiated into this idea, not even Brahma and the World – gods have the power to attain Mukti. Disciple: It is a matter of deep regret that even hearing this from you almost every day, I have not been able to realise it. Swamiji: Renunciation must come, but in the fulness of time. “[(Sanskrit)]– in the fulness of time one attains to knowledge within himself.” When the few Samskaras (tendencies) of the previous life are spent, then renunciation sprouts up in the...

Go on Working Without an Eye to Results (7-2-22)

From The Complete Works of Swami Vivekananda Volume 7- Chapter 2 – Conversations And Dialogues. Taken from the Diary of a Disciple, Shri Sharat Chandra Chakravarty, B.A. At the time Belur Math was established, many among the orthodox Hindus were wont to make sharp criticism of the ways of life in the Math. Hearing the report of such criticism from the disciple, Swamiji would say (in the words of the couplet of Tulasidas), “The elephant passes in the market – place, and a thousand curs begin barking after him; so the Sadhus have no ill – feeling when worldly people slander then.” Or again he would say, “Without persecution no beneficent idea can enter into the heart of a society.” He would exhort everybody, “Go on working without an eye to results. One day you are sure to reap the fruits of it.” Again, on the lips of Swamiji were very often heard the words of the Gita, “A doer of good never comes to grief, my son.” In May or June, 1901, seeing the disciple at the Math Swamiji said, “Bring me a copy of Ashtavimshati – tattva (Twenty – eight Categories) of Raghunandan at an early date.” Disciple: Yes, sir, but what will you do with the Raghunandan Smriti, which the present educated India calls a heap of superstition? Swamiji: Why? Raghunandan was a wonderful scholar of his time. Collecting the ancient Smritis, he codified the customs and observances of the Hindus, adapting them to the needs of the changed times and circumstances. All Bengal is following the rules laid down by him. But in the iron...