Conversations And Dialogues-Shri Priya Nath Sinha (7-2-31)

From The Complete Works of Swami Vivekananda Volume 7- Chapter 2 – Conversations And Dialogues. Taken from the Diary of a Disciple, Shri Priya Nath Sinha Swamiji: A very funny thing happened today. I went to a friend’s house. He has had a picture painted, the subject of which is “Shri Krishna addressing Arjuna on the battlefield of Kurukshetra”. Shri Krishna stands on the chariot, holding the reins in His hand and preaching the Gita to Arjuna. He showed me the picture and asked me how I liked it. “Fairly well”, I said. But as he insisted on having my criticism on it, I had to give my honest opinion by saying, “There is nothing in it to commend itself to me; first, because the chariot of the time of Shri Krishna was not like the modern pagoda – shaped car, and also, there is no expression in the figure of Shri Krishna.” Q.– Was not the pagoda – chariot in use then? Swamiji: Don’t you know that since the Buddhistic era, there has been a great confusion in everything in our country? The kings never used to fight in pagoda – chariots. There are chariots even today in Rajputana that greatly resemble the chariots of old. Have you seen the chariots in the pictures of Grecian mythology? They have two wheels, and one mounts them from behind; we had that sort of chariot. What good is it to paint a picture if the details are wrong? An historical picture comes up to a standard of excellence when after making proper study and research, things are portrayed exactly as...

Conversations and Dialogues-Shri Priya Nath Sinha (7-2-30)

From The Complete Works of Swami Vivekananda Volume 7- Chapter 2 – Conversations And Dialogues. Taken from the Diary of a Disciple, Shri Priya Nath Sinha ¬†Swamiji had a talk with him one day at the Math on this subject. Swamiji remarked, “You see, we have an old adage: `If your son is not inclined to study, put him in the Durbars (Sabha).’ The word Sabha here does not mean social meetings, such as take place occasionally at people’s houses — it means royal Durbars. In the days of the independent kings of Bengal, they used to hold their courts mornings and evenings. There all the affairs of the State were discussed in the morning — and as there were no newspapers at that time, the king used to converse with the leading gentry of the capital and gather from them all information regarding the people and the State. These gentlemen had to attend these meetings, for if they did not do so, the king would inquire into the reason of their non – attendance. Such Durbars were the centres of culture in every country and not merely in ours. In the present day, the western parts of India, especially Rajputana, are much better off in this respect than Bengal, as something similar to these old Durbars still obtains there.” Q.– then, Maharaj, have our people lost their own good manners because we have no kings of our own? Swamiji: It is all a degeneration which has its root in selfishness. That in boarding a steamer one follows the vulgar maxim, “Uncle, save thy own precious skin”, and in...

Everybody Will Attain Mukti, from A Worm Up to Brahma (7-2-29)

From The Complete Works of Swami Vivekananda Volume 7- Chapter 2 – Conversations And Dialogues. Taken from the Diary of a Disciple, Shri Sharat Chandra Chakravarty, B.A. Today is the first of Asharh (June – july). The disciple has come to the Math before dusk from Bally, with his office – dress on, as he has not found time to change it. Coming to the Math, he prostrated himself at the feet of Swamiji and inquired about his health. Swamiji replied that he was well, but looking at his dress, he said, “You put on coat and trousers, why don’t you put on collars?” Saying this, he called Swami Saradananda who was near and said, “Give him tomorrow two collars from my stock.” Swami Saradananda bowed assent to his order. The disciple then changed his office – dress and came to Swamiji, who, addressing him, said, “By giving up one’s national costume and ways of eating and living, one gets denationalised. One can learn from all, but that learning which leads to denationalisation does not help one’s uplift but becomes the cause of degradation.” Disciple: Sir, one cannot do without putting on dress approved by superior European officers in official quarters. Swamiji: No one prevents that. In the interests of your service, you put on official dress in official quarters. But on returning home you should be a regular Bengali Babu — with flowing cloth, a native shirt, and with the Chudder on the shoulder. Do you understand? Disciple: Yes, sir. Swamiji: You go about from house to house only with the European shirt on. In the West, to...

“Now in The Evening of Life, Take The Child Back to His Home” (7-2-28)

From The Complete Works of Swami Vivekananda Volume 7- Chapter 2 – Conversations And Dialogues. Taken from the Diary of a Disciple, Shri Sharat Chandra Chakravarty, B.A. While walking on the banks of the Ganga at Calcutta one afternoon, the disciple saw a Sannyasin in the distance approaching towards Ahiritola Ghat. While he came near, the disciple found the Sannyasin to be no other than his Guru, Swami Vivekananda. In his left hand he had a leaf receptacle containing fried gram, which he was eating like a boy, and was walking in great joy. When he stood before him, the disciple fell at his feet and asked the reason for his coming to Calcutta unexpectedly. Swamiji: I came on business. Come, will you go to the Math? Eat a little of the fried gram. It has a nice saline and pungent taste. The disciple took the food with gladness and agreed to go to the Math with him. Swamiji: Then look for a boat. The disciple hurried to hire a boat. He was settling the amount of the boat – hire with the boatman, who demanded eight annas, when Swamiji also appeared on the scene and stopped the disciple saying, “Why are you higgling with them?” and said to the boatman, “Very well, I will give you eight annas”, and got into the boat. That boat proceeded slowly against the current and took nearly an hour and half to reach the Math. Being alone with Swamiji in the boat, the disciple had an opportunity of asking him freely about all subjects. Raising the topic of the glorificatory poem which...

“If The Mind is Pure, Then The Mother Ganga Will Appear Here.” (7-2-27)

From The Complete Works of Swami Vivekananda Volume 7- Chapter 2 – Conversations And Dialogues. Taken from the Diary of a Disciple, Shri Sharat Chandra Chakravarty, B.A. Swamiji was now staying at the Math. The disciple came to the Math and towards the evening accompanied Swamiji and Swami Premananda for a walk. Finding Swamiji absorbed in thought, the disciple entered into a conversation with Swami Premananda on what Shri Ramakrishna used to say of Swamiji’s greatness. After walking some distance Swamiji turned to go back to the Math. Seeing Swami Premananda and the disciple near by, he said, “Well, what were you talking?” The disciple said, “We were talking about Shri Ramakrishna and his words.” Swamiji only heard the reply, but again lapsed into thought and walking along the road returned to the Math. He sat on the camp – cot placed under the mango – tree and, resting there some time, washed his face and then, pacing the upper verandah, spoke to the disciple thus: “Why do you not set about propagating Vedanta in your part of the country? There Tantrikism prevails to a fearful extent. Rouse and agitate the country with the lion – roar of Advaitavada (monism). Then I shall know you to be a Vedantist. First open a Sanskrit school there and teach the Upanishads and the Brahma – sutras . Teach the boys the system of Brahmacharya. I have heard that in your country there is much logic – chopping of the Nyaya school. What is there in it? Only Vyapti (pervasiveness) and Anumana (inference)– on these subjects the Pandits of the Nyaya school...