Letter to Brother

From Epistles – Third Series of Volume 7 of The Complete Works of Swami Vivekananda (Translated from Bengali) 54 W. 33 NEW YORK, 25th April, 1895. DEAR BROTHER (To Dr. I. Janes.), I was away in the Catskill mountains and it was almost impossible to get a letter regularly posted from where I was — so accept my apology for the delay in offering you my most heartfelt thanks for your letter in the “Eagle”. It was so scholarly, truthful and noble and withal so permeated with your natural universal love for the good and true everywhere. It is a great work to bring this world into a spirit of sympathy with each other but it should be done no doubt when such brave souls as you still hold your own. Lord help you ever and ever my brother and may you live long to carry on the mighty work you and your society has undertaken. With my gratitude and love to you and to the members of the Ethical Society. I remain Yours ever truly,...

Letter to Adhyapakji -VII

From Epistles – Third Series of Volume 7 of The Complete Works of Swami Vivekananda (Translated from Bengali) 541 DEARBORN AVE., CHICAGO, 24th May, 1894. DEAR ADHYAPAKJI (Prof. John Henry Wright), Herewith I forward to you a letter from one of our ruling princes of Rajputana, His Highness the Maharaja of Khetri, and another from the opium commissioner, late minister of Junagad, one of the largest states in India, and a man who is called the Gladstone of India. These I hope would convince you of my being no fraud. One thing I forgot to tell you. I never identified myself anyway with Mr. Mazoomdar’s party chief. (Evidently, Keshab Chandra Sen.) If he says so, he does not speak the truth. I hope, after your perusal, you will kindly send the letters over to me, except the pamphlet which I do not care for. I am bound, my dear friend, to give you every satisfaction of my being a genuine Sannyasin, but to you alone. I do not care what the rabbles say or think about me. “Some would call you a saint, some a chandala; some a lunatic, others a demon. Go on then straight to thy work without heeding either” — thus saith one of our great Sannyasins, an old emperor of India, King Bhartrihari, who joined the order in old times. May the Lord bless you for ever and ever. My love to all your children and my respects to your noble wife. I remain ever your friend, VIVEKANANDA. PS. — I had connection with Pundit Shiva Nath Shastri’s party — but only on points of social...

The Destiny Of Man

From The Complete Works of Swami Vivekananda Volume 7- Chapter 4 – Notes Of Class Talks and Lectures (Delivered in Memphis on January 17, 1894: Reported in Appeal-Avalanche) The audience was moderately large, and was made up of the best literary and musical talent of the city, including some of the most distinguished members of the legal fraternity and financial institutions. The speaker differs in one respect in particular from some American orators. He advances his ideas with as much deliberation as a professor of mathematics demon – strates an example in algebra to his students. Kananda [In those days Swamiji was generally referred to by American press as Vive Kananda.]  speaks with perfect faith in his own powers and ability to hold successfully his position against all argument. He advances no ideas, nor make assertions that he does not follow up to a logical conclusion. Much of his lecture is something on the order of Ingersoll’s philosophy. He does not believe in future punishment nor in God as Christians believe in Him. He does not believe the mind is immortal, from the fact that it is dependent, and nothing can be immortal except it is independent of all things. He says: “God is not a king sitting away in one corner of the universe to deal out punishment or rewards according to a man’s deeds here on earth, and the time will come when man will know the truth, and stand up and say, ‘I am God,’ am life of His life. Why teach that God is far away when our real nature, our immortal principle is God? “Be...

Stand Upon Truth, and You Have Got God(7-1-34)

From Inspired Talks of Volume 7 of The Complete Works of Swami Vivekananda – Chapter I- Recorded by Miss S.E.Waldo, A Disciple SATURDAY, July 27, 1895. (Kathopanishad) Learn not the truth of the Self save from one who has realised it; in all others it is mere talk. Realisation is beyond virtue and vice, beyond future and past; beyond all the pairs of opposites. “The stainless one sees the Self, and an eternal calm comes in the Soul.” Talking, arguing, and reading books, the highest flights of the intellect, the Vedas themselves, all these cannot give knowledge of the Self. In us are two — The God-soul and the man-soul. The sages know that the latter is but the shadow, that the former is the only real Sun. Unless we join the mind with the senses, we get no report from eyes, nose, ears, etc. The external organs are used by the power of the mind. Do not let the senses go outside, and then you can get rid of body and the external world. This very “x” which we see here as an external world, the departed see as heaven or hell according to their own mental states. Here and hereafter are two dreams, the latter modelled on the former; get rid of both, all is omnipresent, all is now. Nature, body, and mind go to death, not we; we never go nor come. The man Swami Vivekananda is in nature, is born, and dies; but the self which we see as Swami Vivekananda is never born and never dies. It is the eternal and unchangeable Reality. The...

Practical Religion: Breathing and Meditation

The Yoga doctrine, which we are having our lecture on, is not from that standpoint. [It teaches that] there is the soul, and inside this soul is all power. It is already there, and if we can master this body, all the power will be unfolded. All knowledge is in the soul. Why are people struggling? To lessen the misery…. All unhappiness is caused by our not having mastery over the body…. We are all putting the cart before the horse…. Take the system of work, for instance. We are trying to do good by … comforting the poor. We do not get to the cause which created the misery. It is like taking a bucket to empty out the ocean, and more [water] comes all the time. The Yogi sees that this is nonsense. [He says that] the way out of misery is to know the cause of misery first…. We try to do the good we can. What for? If there is an incurable disease, why should we struggle and take care of ourselves? If the utilitarians say: “Do not bother about soul and God!” what is that to the Yogi and what is it to the world? The world does not derive any good [from such an attitude]. More and more misery is going on all the time….

“The Science of Breathing”

The mind ought to control every bit of Prana that has been worked up in the body…. [The] mind should have entire control of the body. That is not [the case] with all. With most of us it is the other way. The mind should be able to control every part of [the body] just at will. That is reason, philosophy; but [when] we come to matters of fact, it is not so. For you, on the other hand, the cart is before the horse. It is the body mastering the mind. If my finger gets pinched, I become sorry. The body works upon the mind. If anything happens which I do not like to happen, I am worried; my mind [is] thrown off its balance. The body is master of the mind. We have become bodies. We are nothing else but bodies just now.