New York Times May 2, 1894

The Complete Works of Swami Vivekananda/Unpublished/New York Times May 2, 1894 Members of V Club Hear About the Vegetarian Diet of the Far East The second vegetarian dinner of the V Club was held at the St. Denis Hotel, Broadway and Eleventh Street, last night. About fifty members were present. Only vegetables and fruits appeared on the menu, and sterilized water, chocolate, coffee, and tea made up the drinkables. Between the toasts several original songs were rendered by J. Williams Macy. S. C. T. Dodd replied to the toast “Vanity,” and Mary T. Burt, in the absence of Mrs. Ella Dietz Clymer, to that of “Virtue”. Swami Vivekananda, a Hindu of high caste, said that vegetarianism had its beginning in India. “It is often stated,” he said, “that because Hindus believe in transmigration of souls they would not kill and eat animals because they feared that they would eat some of their ancestors. There is not a word of truth in this statement. Some of the greatest propagandists of vegetarianism do not believe in God nor in a soul. Therefore, the fear of eating one of their ancestors could not affect them. “Nearly three-quarters of the people of India are vegetarians. They are so because they are too kind to kill animals for food. “In this country, when animals are injured, it is the custom to kill them. In India it is the rule to send them to a hospital. In approaching Bombay, the first thing the traveler comes across is a very large hospital for animals. This has been the practice for 4,000 years.” Mrs. J. De La...

Your Highness -2

The Complete Works of Swami Vivekananda/Unpublished/ Your Highness BOMBAY The 22nd May [18]93 YOUR HIGHNESS, Leaving Khetri there happened nothing particular to relate except that I had every comfort on the way, broke journey at Kharari and then [went] to Nariad [Nadiad]. Haridas Bhai was as usual very kind to me and we had many and many a talk about your Highness, so much so that he was really very anxious to see you and intends paying his respects to your Highness in his coming winter tour to the north. And I dare say your Highness would also be very much pleased to see this old man of great experience who was for twenty-five years the mentor of Kathiawad. Withal he is the only remnant of the old school of very conservative politicians. He is a man who is thoroughly able to organize and put to perfect order an existing machinery; but he would be the last man to move a step further. At Bombay I went to see my friend Ramdas, Barrister-at-Law. He is rather a sentimental gentleman and was so much impressed with your Highness’ character that he told me that had it not been midsummer he would rather fly to see such a prince. His father intends going to Chicago on the 31st; if so, we would go together for company. Today I go to buy some steel trunks etc., and am only waiting for the Madras money to come in. Although I wired to them from Jeypore, they were rather suspicious and waited for my further communications and I have again wired them and written...

Your Highness -1

The Complete Works of Swami Vivekananda/Unpublished/I Your Highness MADRAS the 15th February [1893] YOUR HIGHNESS, Two things I am telling your Highness. One – a very wonderful phenomenon I have seen in a village called Kumbakonam, and another about myself. In the said village lives a man of the Chetty caste, generally passing for an astrologer. I, with two other young men, went to see him. He was said to tell about anything a man thinks of. So, I wanted to put him to the test. Two months ago, I dreamt that my mother was dead and I was very anxious to know about her. My second was whether what my Guru had told me was right. The third was a test-question — a part of the Buddhistic mantra, in Tibetan tongue. These questions I determined upon, two days before going to this Govinda Chetty. Another young man had one of his sisters-in-law given poison to, by some unknown hand, from which she recovered. But he wanted to know the author of that delivery. When we first saw him, the fellow was almost ferocious. He said that some Europeans came to see [him] with the Dewan of Mysore and that since then through their ‘Dristee Dosham’ he had got fever and that he could not give us a seance then and only if we paid him 10 Rs., he would consent to tell us our ‘prasnas’. The young men with me of course were ready to pay down his fees. But he goes to his private room and immediately comes back and says to me that if I gave...